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During his opening monologue, Tucker Carlson laid the SMACK DOWN on American Intelligence Agencies, calling them “corrupt” and “politicized” and accusing them of being the driving force behind allegations that continue to slow down our Government and our President.

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“[I]t’s always possible that a high-level Russian defector will appear sometime in the future with documents proving that Jeff Sessions is, in fact, a foreign agent, perhaps of a sleeper cell sent to Alabama during the Cold War and activated at Vladimir Putin’s request during the last election,” Carlson quipped. “That would be a game changer. Otherwise, the Russian conspiracy seemed to hit a cul-de-sac this afternoon in the Senate, but that doesn’t mean there are no scandals for Congress to investigate.”

“Here’s one – maybe the biggest one of all – our intel services are corrupt, and they’re politicized, and they’re making it very hard to run U.S. government,” he continued. “And that may be the point since they clearly like to run it themselves and they are to some extent. Does that sound like an overstatement?”

“Consider how much of American politics now revolves around information that has been strategically, often misleadingly and illegally released, for political effects. The hearings you watched today are just one example.”

“How could this possibly have advanced American security interest, which is what they were supposed to be doing?” he added. “None of it did. It was entirely political. And then in March, as if to prove this point, a half-dozen current and former intel officials told The New York Times how they sought to spread classified intelligence information about the Trump campaign as widely as possible throughout government to assure that it would all eventually leak. Now, leaks are as old as government, and sometimes they are welcome. In general, the public ought to know a lot more about government than it does. But we are seeing something new at work here. These are not leaks from political appointees, the kind that formed the basis of Bob Woodward’s books – the kind we benefit from in journalism a lot.”