Researchers Discover New Drug Cuts COVID Infection by 70%

Over the past year, a number of drugs that actually help COVID-19 patients have been banned for no good reason other than being promoted by President Trump.

A study out of the UK revealed the name of a drug that has shown to be effective in the treatment of COVID-19. The findings of the report were announced last Friday.

Researchers conducted the lab studies on a cholesterol drug that is already on the market.

Fenofibrate and fenofibric acid could potentially significantly reduce the symptoms of the virus in human cells. Dr. Elisa Vincenci, a member of the Milan-based San Rafael Scientific Institute, suggests that further studies be performed on this promising drug. The report is now published in the Frontiers of Pharmacology Journal.

It is an affordable oral medication. The fenofibrate study indicates that patients can experience up to a 70% reduction in coronavirus-related symptoms.

Dr. Farhat Khanim, a professor at the University of Birmingham, spoke out about another similar study. He referred to the viral variants that are rapidly spreading around in numerous countries even with the vaccine in play.

Fox 5 News reported,

“Whilst vaccination has been shown to reduce infection rates and severity of disease, we are as yet unsure of the strength and duration of the response. Therapies are still urgently needed to manage COVID-19 patients who develop symptoms or require hospitalisation,” Dr Alan Richardson, of Keele University in the UK, wrote in part.

The drug was suggested to work by inhibiting the harmful overproduction of cytokines tied to coronavirus infection, and also treat airway inflammation. Additional properties could prevent blood clotting seen in late-stage disease in many COVID-19 patients, study authors noted.

Researchers continue to gather data on the infection rate and death toll caused by the variants even with the availability of several vaccines. There are more studies underway on fenofibrate. Some people expect that, after this report, it will likely be blacklisted.

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